3 Best Baseball Camps in Wilmington NC

May 12, 2017 by Anonymous in  baseball camps Baseball Dad's Baseball Mom's

#3 Mark Scalf Little League Day Camp (UNCW’s Baseball Camp)

Our third-ranked camp in Wilmington is the UNCW Baseball Camp. This camp is awesome. Anytime you can get D1 instruction you should get it! A D1 scholarship is the goal of many baseball players, and players’ parents. Going to camps like these is a great way to achieve that goal!

Ages: 6-11

Location: Brooks Field – UNC Wilmington Campus

Monday, June 19, 2017 to Thursday, June 22, 2017

Camp Cost: $200 – 3 days

Camp Activities:

  • Infield play
  • Outfield play
  • Pitching and throwing mechanics
  • Hitting fundamentals
  • Catcher skills
  • Bunting
  • Base running
  • Instructional scrimmage games and more!

#2 Wilmington Sharks Kids Camp

Our second ranked camp in Wilmington this summer is the Wilmington Sharks Kids Camp. Led by ballplayers with D1 and Professional experience, this camp is great for elevating your kid’s game. The coaching staff with the Sharks is fantastic, and their energy is contagious. This camp is a must for Wilmington Ballplayers.

Ages: 5-13

Location: The Shark Tank

Monday, June 19, 2017 to Thursday, June 22, 2017

Camp Cost: $150 – 3 days

Link to Their Camp: http://www.wilmingtonsharks.com/community/kids-camp

Camp Amenities:

  • Game Ticket for Thursday, June 22nd game
  • Souvenir and Autograph Session with Shark Players
  • Lunch Party + Sharks T-Shirt on Last Day!
  • Each day, a snack will be served

#1 American Baseball Camps Fun Clinic

Our top ranked camp this summer in Wilmington is the American Baseball Camps Fun Clinic. This may be a little biased as we’re the ones putting together this list but we are D1 baseball players who have been to all these camps and know how to put on a better one. This is a brand new company with a new type of youth baseball camp. We still have all of the qualifications of a normal youth baseball camp, ours is just more fun!

Camp is put on by D1 and Professional ballplayers, as well as Wilmington Sharks Players, who will encourage your kids and teach them fun and exciting new baseball games. All three of these camps will elevate your kid’s game, this one however, may be the highlight of your child’s summer!

Ages: 4-12 COED

The “X FACTOR” In Youth Baseball

May 26, 2017

The Prepared vs. The Unprepared

I was working on hitting with a 6 year old kid the other day. Just as a favor, one of our family friends asked me to work with her boy. This kid plays t-ball in Oklahoma and is a pretty good little player.

But as I was tossing the ball to him he kept swinging and missing. He said with the utmost confidence “I can’t do it”, even though he ended up foul tipping it, and then connecting with one a few tosses later.

It occurred to me that this particular kid, who is a pretty good player, had never attempted to hit a baseball that wasn’t on a tee! In fact, I’m not so sure he had ever practiced outside of baseball practice. This is what we are going to call the under-prepared player, and he is placed in a severe disadvantage.

On my circuit around the state talking with Youth Baseball Coaches about American Baseball Camps, I overheard a certain coach talking to his 7U team. He was cancelling practice for the next day because he didn’t want the kids to get sick with the cold-front (the forecast was 60 degrees).

This encounter helped me realize that the X FACTOR in youth baseball is getting better outside of organized baseball. You cannot rely on your 9 year old kid’s coach to develop him fully as a player. My friends’ kid practices maybe once or twice before the season, and then plays one game a week. I’m telling you, if your kid is only playing baseball when he has his uniform on, and mom is taking pictures, he is going to have a tough time being great.

When I was 3 years old, and this can be proven with video, I asked for & hit in a batting cage throwing 36 miles per hour. What kind of a 3 year old asks to do that on his birthday? This is because I grew up around baseball, I watched my brothers play, I watched my dad coach, and I was hungry to play! I played all the time, I threw the ball up to myself, and threw into a net when I didn’t have anyone to play catch with. I was always playing wiffle ball, and watching my brothers’ games. Do you think by the time I was 6 I didn’t believe in myself that I could hit a ball tossed to me? No I was the kid saying “I’m going to smoke this ball.”

The difference in baseball environments between myself and the aforementioned 6 year old is what I believe to be the X FACTOR in Youth Baseball. It is what can set your kid apart from the pack.

To demonstrate this further lets take two kids and you decide which one will be the dominant player on his team.

Player #1

Signs up for t-ball and is excited for his first practice.

Practices a couple times before his first game and spends approximately 1.5 hours a week playing.

Mom leaves his glove and bat in the car until the next game

Player #2

Signs up for t-ball with a comprehensive understanding of the game and how it works. Including an understanding of the force out rule.

Practices almost if-not everyday with friends or family in the backyard with a bat and a ball, or a broomstick and a tennis ball, anything they can get their hands on.

Sleeps with his glove on his nightstand, loves to play catch and have dad hit him ground balls and fly-balls in the backyard

The Highest Probability of Success

What I am saying is not that player #1 will never be successful, or that parents need to drill their kid to be like player #2. My point is that baseball is a sport that requires “reps.” Why do division 1 shortstops take 100 ground balls a day? Because it makes it so easy by the time they get one in the game that it becomes routine. It takes practice to become a great baseball player, you can’t just show up and rely on athleticism.

Baseball is a beautiful sport because it is proven that a kid that gets more reps outside of baseball will be better than a more athletic kid that doesn’t understand or practice the game.

You can’t make a kid love a sport, and you don’t want to be that baseball parent that is resented for trying to force work-ethic. But you can certainly help cultivate a baseball environment at home. Your kid will never be great if he is only doing baseball things at the field twice a week, with a practice every other.

The kids that have a passion for the game have been and always will be the best.

That is the X FACTOR in youth baseball, getting extra baseball reps outside of baseball practice/games.

“Those that fail to prepare are preparing to fail” – Ben Frankin

 

–  Blog written by an American Baseball Camps Coach

American Baseball Camps — Two Quick Tips For Baseball Parents

Apr 30, 2017

So you want your kid to be a great baseball player?

Here are 2 quick tips that can help you become a better baseball parent while nudging him in the right direction! Why trust us? We’re division 1 baseball players that have been playing the game for close to 20 years and have seen the good, the bad, and the ugly, when it comes to baseball parents. And trust us when we say this, we’ve seen some brutal baseball parents.

So what do the best baseball parents do?

#2 Try to remain composed during the game

Dad’s – You are not Joe Maddon sitting on the steps of the dugout with your color coated lineup card and tendency chart but you can certainly remain composed like him. There is a reason the higher up you go in baseball the more composed the coaches/managers are. It’s simply because the data is there to prove that a more relaxed baseball player is a better baseball player study.

Mom’s – Try to keep calm (even though its baseball season). I don’t know what it is about mom’s but they get more fired up about bad calls and bad coaching than anyone on the whole field. Don’t be that mom that’s loud an obnoxious, instead, try to be knowledgeable, laid back, and supportive. My mom helped me out of some of the worst slumps in my life and its because she always let me come to her first. I think if you smother/bombard him, he wont be vulnerable with you. That’s why being laid back if your a baseball mom is the way to go.

#1 Have a little feel

A couple of definitions before we start:

  • *Sav – short for “savvy” and means that you’re aware of your surroundings, and that you know a lot about the game.
  • *Feel – almost exactly like sav. someone that has no feel is someone that isn’t aware of their surroundings, doesn’t realize the situation they are in, or hasn’t been around the game long enough to in any way know what’s going on.
    • An example of someone with no sav and no feel would be like Smalls from The Sandlot when he doesn’t know who Babe Ruth is.
  • Salty Vet – An older person who has a lot of feel and/or sav.

Every baseball player will get to that age where he starts to develop some feel for how baseball functions should go on. If you are still going to want to encourage and help your kid when he gets to that age, you are going to have to know your stuff as well! Baseball is a game of endless situations, and the more you watch intently the more you can learn about the game. D1 coaches tell their players to watch baseball on tv because it makes you a better baseball player, and it teaches you feel and sav. For a parent, the goal is to become a salty vet that knows the game and is respected, rather than the laughing stock of the bleachers.

Below we’ve mapped out a few guidelines:

Parents with no feel:

  • Yell at the umpire at every close strike call
  • Second guess the head coach, and try to talk to him about playing time
  • Scream and yell at their kids like a crazy old ice cream truck salesman
  • Make everything about them and not about their kid

Parents with feel:

  • Under-promise and over-deliver with stuff like gear and dinner/ice cream after (depending on age).
  • Dress athletic and are up to date on what they wear.
  • Never ever ever talk to the head coach about playing time, it can only hurt.
  • Make things look effortless like social media, baseball gear knowledge, or overall knowledge of the game.

 

In baseball parenting you can either be the windshield or the bug. Don’t be the embarrassing, loud, overbearing, no feel bug. Be the windshield.

 

– Authors Anonymous 1 and 2 (for NCAA reasons we are not able to disclose the D1 Programs we play for)

*Both authors are pro prospects

 

Camps can be the highlight of your child’s summer! Great camps create memories that stick with a child for a lifetime! Enough with all the media. Encourage your kid to put the phone down, and get outside and make memories that he’ll never forget!

American Baseball Camps — 3 Quick Tips For Baseball Parents

May 11, 2017

#3 Help Build Good Nutrition Habits

One of the things that can set a great baseball player apart from the good ones is nutrition! Good eating habits can make a young ballplayer feel better and play better! (study) The best season I ever had in baseball was the one where I started eating right. They talk about it so much in Division 1 baseball, I really wish I would have known about it when I was a young player. That’s why we’re calling it “building” good nutrition habits. If you can teach your young ballplayer to eat right now, he won’t depart from it when he’s old.

#2 Watch Quality Baseball with your Kid

 

This is that “being a student of the game” thing that we’re always talking about. Every great baseball program in the country insists on its players that they watch MLB games. Why? It makes you a better ballplayer. Imagine your kid being the smartest baseball player with the highest baseball IQ on the field. Imagine how much better that will make him if he’s mentally one step ahead of the competition. How do you do that? You watch the best players play on the biggest stages. Go to a major league game if you can, or if you don’t want to spend big bucks, seek out college games in your area.

#1 Understand That During The Game is Not The Right Time

I was watching a my 13 year old cousin play the other day and he popped up to center field. Sitting by his mom she asked me if I thought his elbow was raised and that’s why he popped it up. BASEBALL PARENTS, I’ll tell you the same thing my division 1 coach tells us players, 99% of the time its not mechanical. Baseball lessons and an excessively growing industry of “hitting coaches” has got kids and parents thinking way too much about mechanics.

Even if it is mechanical, during the game is the last time he should be thinking about something like his elbow placement at contact. Save that stuff for when he is working off a tee in practice or in the off season. Trust me on this one, those are the times for mechanical adjustments. The only in-game adjustments he should be making are timing and confidence adjustments. What those might look like are as follows:

Timing adjustments – This should be the primary purpose of the on-deck circle. If you were out front your last at bat (like my cousin was when he popped up), you should try to start your load later. Differences in velocity on the mound should dictate when you start your load. If your kid is consistently out in front or late on fast balls, just encourage him to start earlier or start later. Timing adjustments are the most effective, and easiest ways to not make the same mistake twice in baseball.

Confidence adjustments – If your young slugger is lacking confidence, consider something different. At my D1 program they teach us the “octagon walk.” This is where you walk up to the plate with the biggest chest in the room and you hold the bat by the barrel as you walk. It is all about walking up to the plate with as much confidence as possible. Also look at helping him with his self-talk. Bad self-talk can be one of the biggest self-esteem destroyers for a young player. Build him up, and teach him to build himself up.

Just remember, good nutrition will make your little leaguer feel better and play better. Watching high-level baseball will teach him Baseball IQ that will take away many of the mental mistakes that plague young players. And finally, encourage the right kind of adjustments during the game. Mechanical overload will kill a young hitter and it will fill his mind with the wrong thoughts. Instead, encourage him to walk to the plate with confidence, and focus on timing up the pitcher, rather than the mechanics of his young/unrefined swing.

 

Blog provided by American Baseball Camps — ABC’s mission is to make baseball fun again so they provide great summer fun camps for kids ages 12 and under. If you will share this blog post and use coupon code: “blog” at checkout, you can receive 20% off your order!

American Baseball Camps have baseball camps in Tulsa, a baseball camp in Wichita, baseball camp in Wilmington, baseball camp in Dallas, baseball camp in KC, & baseball camp in Tahlequah! If you’re looking for something fun to do this summer, check out American Baseball Camps!

 

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