American Baseball Camps — Two Quick Tips For Baseball Parents

Apr 30, 2017 by Nick Rotola CEO of American Baseball Camps in  baseball camps Baseball Showcase D1 Baseball Events

So you want your kid to be a great baseball player?

Here are 2 quick tips that can help you become a better baseball parent while nudging him in the right direction! Why trust us? We’re division 1 baseball players that have been playing the game for close to 20 years and have seen the good, the bad, and the ugly, when it comes to baseball parents. And trust us when we say this, we’ve seen some brutal baseball parents.

So what do the best baseball parents do?

#2 Try to remain composed during the game

Dad’s – You are not Joe Maddon sitting on the steps of the dugout with your color coated lineup card and tendency chart but you can certainly remain composed like him. There is a reason the higher up you go in baseball the more composed the coaches/managers are. It’s simply because the data is there to prove that a more relaxed baseball player is a better baseball player study.

Mom’s – Try to keep calm (even though its baseball season). I don’t know what it is about mom’s but they get more fired up about bad calls and bad coaching than anyone on the whole field. Don’t be that mom that’s loud an obnoxious, instead, try to be knowledgeable, laid back, and supportive. My mom helped me out of some of the worst slumps in my life and its because she always let me come to her first. I think if you smother/bombard him, he wont be vulnerable with you. That’s why being laid back if your a baseball mom is the way to go.

#1 Have a little feel

A couple of definitions before we start:

  • *Sav – short for “savvy” and means that you’re aware of your surroundings, and that you know a lot about the game.
  • *Feel – almost exactly like sav. someone that has no feel is someone that isn’t aware of their surroundings, doesn’t realize the situation they are in, or hasn’t been around the game long enough to in any way know what’s going on.
    • An example of someone with no sav and no feel would be like Smalls from The Sandlot when he doesn’t know who Babe Ruth is.
  • Salty Vet – An older person who has a lot of feel and/or sav.

Every baseball player will get to that age where he starts to develop some feel for how baseball functions should go on. If you are still going to want to encourage and help your kid when he gets to that age, you are going to have to know your stuff as well! Baseball is a game of endless situations, and the more you watch intently the more you can learn about the game. D1 coaches tell their players to watch baseball on tv because it makes you a better baseball player, and it teaches you feel and sav. For a parent, the goal is to become a salty vet that knows the game and is respected, rather than the laughing stock of the bleachers.

Below we’ve mapped out a few guidelines:

Parents with no feel:

  • Yell at the umpire at every close strike call
  • Second guess the head coach, and try to talk to him about playing time
  • Scream and yell at their kids like a crazy old ice cream truck salesman
  • Make everything about them and not about their kid

Parents with feel:

  • Under-promise and over-deliver with stuff like gear and dinner/ice cream after (depending on age).
  • Dress athletic and are up to date on what they wear.
  • Never ever ever talk to the head coach about playing time, it can only hurt.
  • Make things look effortless like social media, baseball gear knowledge, or overall knowledge of the game.

 

In baseball parenting you can either be the windshield or the bug. Don’t be the embarrassing, loud, overbearing, no feel bug. Be the windshield.

 

– Authors Anonymous 1 and 2 (for NCAA reasons we are not able to disclose the D1 Programs we play for)

*Both authors are pro prospects

 

Camps can be the highlight of your child’s summer! Great camps create memories that stick with a child for a lifetime! Enough with all the media. Encourage your kid to put the phone down, and get outside and make memories that he’ll never forget!

American Baseball Camps — 5 Things You Must do to Play Division 1 Baseball

May 08, 2017

Everyone wants to play D1 baseball; only 1% of high school players will go on to play at D1 programs. Want to be part of that 1%? Below are five things that we have indicated as current D1 baseball players that can set you apart from the pack.

 

1. Staying Even Keel

Everybody knows that kid growing up who slams his helmet when he gets out and no matter how the team is doing he is upset if he isn’t playing well. This type of selfishness doesn’t work at the Division 1 level. Besides your parents and some of your close friends, no one is concerned with the type of game you have, scouts and D1 coaches want winners that stay even keel no matter the situation. I’ve seen guys who were drafted lower then they were projected or not get drafted at all because they can’t keep their composure when it hits the fan. In D1 baseball you will fail and coaches and recruiters will know that. So if you want to play at that level, you have to figure out how to be that guy that doesn’t let things spiral out of control after an 0-4 game. Be a gamer and try to be the same guy day in and day out.

 

2. Physicality/ Looking the Part

In Junior College I was putting up ridiculous numbers. When I would ask the scouts what I was doing wrong and why I hadn’t been drafted, they all said that I needed to put on 20-25 pounds. Size not only tells D1 and pro scouts that you are strong, but it also tells them that you will be durable down the stretch. Don’t let size be the reason you don’t go D1. Don’t say “I can’t put on weight,” I don’t know how many guys (including myself) that said that over their career but are now 200 pounds. Watch the D1 players on TV, if they are 20-30 pounds heavier than you then you need to step up physically  and it can be done.

Obviously this will vary depending on your height, but this is a general weight and body fat percentage that D1 players play at for each position.

Corner INF 200lb-2351b  12-15%

MIF 180lb-195lb  8-11%

Speed OF 180lb-195lb  7-10%

Power OF 200lb-225lb  12-15%

Catcher 205lb-230lb  12-15%

Pitchers Finesse Arm 180lb-205lb 10-13%

Pitchers Power Arm 200lb-230lb  13-17%

 

3. Play to Your Strengths

If you are reading this article, then you have expectations of playing D1 baseball. If you think that you can get to that level, then you are doing something right. You are probably playing well and are one of the best guys on your high school or club team. To play at the D1 level you will have to play to your strengths. Be realistic about the type of player you are and don’t deviate from you strengths. Think about what your strengths and your weaknesses are; play to your strengths and hide your weaknesses. If your a guy who can really run then work at bats, get on base, and steal bags. Also, teach yourself to bunt. D1 coaches love a fast guy that can drag; it will boost your average. If you are a power guy, look to strike out less and get your pitch. When you get it, let it eat. If you are good with the glove, don’t big league your ground balls between innings. D1 coaches are always watching and that could be your one chance to show how good you are with the glove.

 

4. Be a Student of the Game

This is one of the best ways to develop what we call in D1 baseball “feel.” You can learn a lot from watching baseball. Find your guy on youtube that is at your position or is a similar hitter as your and model your game after them. Watch your teammates at bats and learn what the pitcher is doing; pick up patterns. Guys think they have four at bats per game, But they actually 30+ at bats if they are watching while their buddies are hitting. You can learn a lot from watching the guys in front of you and finding tendencies. If you can pick up on pitchers tendencies you will steal more bags, you’ll put up better numbers at the plate, and you will stay locked in while other guys are losing focus and giving away at bats.

 

5. Surround Yourself with The Right People

The best way to make good friends in baseball is being a good teammate. Surrounding yourself with good friends that share the same passion for the game will help you through the ups and downs of baseball. Have a good lifting partner that will encourage you to get better and stronger in the weight room. Have a buddy you can go and hit with if you want to work on your swing. Have a good throwing partner that takes a simple thing such as playing catch seriously. If you are reading this article you are likely a in the top of your lineup. Surround yourself with the guys hitting around; this will keep you comfortable during games. Develop accountability partners that will keep you from spiraling out of control. Surrounding yourself with good people is the best way to better yourself while still having fun at the yard. It won’t be the hits or the home runs that you remember, it will be the people and the relationships you made along the way.

 

Author: Anonymous 1 and 2 (for NCAA reasons)

Though this blog was beneficial? please share on FB and like us on FB & Instagram!

With 72% of youth baseball players quitting by age 13 – American Baseball Camps came on to the scene in 2015 to help young players fall in love with the game and to “get better & gain confidence.” We offer camps mostly for ages 6-12.

We do this with baseball camps all over the us including but not limited to: baseball camps in benbrook texas, baseball camps in oklahoma city oklahoma, baseball camps in citrus heights california, baseball camps in hackensack new jersey, baseball camps in kansas city missouri, baseball camps in kissimmee florida, baseball camps in lake elsinore california, baseball camps in modesto california, baseball camps in norton massachusetts, baseball camps in orange california, baseball camps in peachtree city georgia, baseball camps in santa monica california, baseball camps in st louis missouri, baseball camps in topeka kansas, baseball camps in tulsa oklahoma, baseball camps in west covina california, baseball camps in wichita kansas, baseball camps in phoenix arizona, baseball camps in milwaukee wisconsin, baseball camps in dallas texas, baseball camps in baton rouge lousiana, baseball camps in florence kentucky, baseball camps in columbia south carolina.

 

View more or sign up at American Baseball Camps!

American Baseball Camps — 5 Healthy Habits For Young Ballplayers

May 15, 2017

#1 Eat Healthy

According to a Children’s Lifestyle study at the University of Chicago, children perform better mentally when they get the appropriate nutrition. Young players and parents of young ballplayers don’t realize how important mental performance is in baseball. Food can be fuel for a young ballplayer. I didn’t start eating healthy until my Junior year of college at the D1 level and I will tell you that it was my best year. You don’t get tired as easily, and your brain is sharp when you are putting the right things in your body. Baseball is more mental than you think, eating healthy could give your kid an edge over the competition.

“Baseball is 90% mental, and the other half is physical” – Yogi Berra

#2 Learn From Mistakes

I know that the new thing is participation trophies and everyone is a winner, but I think that kind of mindset can hurt a young ballplayer. Mistakes and failure can be very productive if a kid can learn from them! The kids that were able to learn from their mistakes were the ones that were the most successful growing up. Even at the D1 level this can set a player apart. Why make the same mistake twice? Why keep swinging at curveballs in the dirt when it is the only place the pitcher is throwing his curveball. Mental adjustments and being able to learn from mistakes can set a young player apart.

“The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results”

#3 Get Enough Sleep

According to The Sleep Foundation kids aged 5-12 need 9-11 hours of sleep per night. Sleep has many implications in athletics. Players that get the appropriate amount of sleep are more sharp, they have quicker reflexes, and they have greater stamina. This could set your young ballplayer apart in that final inning when the rest of the team is yawning up a storm.

 

#4 Exercise Daily — The Fun Kind

Exercise doesn’t have to be lifting weights! Young ballplayers that exercise daily can set themselves apart. Remember, the average kid aged 5-12 spends 6.5 hours a day looking at their phone, this cuts into the natural athletic development that occurs when a kid exercises. Want your kid to be the most athletic one on his little league team? Here are some fun things that build muscle & athleticism — Racquetball, tennis, basketball, jump rope, wall-ball, relay races with friends, swimming, boxing, sit-ups, push-ups, grippers, ladders, box jumps.

 

#5 Baseball Isn’t Everything

One of the most healthy habits to develop as a young baseball player is to realize that baseball isn’t everything. 70% of ballplayers are out of the sport by 13 because of the pressure. Something my D1 coach always used to say is: “pressure is something that you put on yourself.” Your young ballplayer has a choice whether he cries or not everytime he strikes out. One of the best ways to avoid that kind of feeling when you fail in baseball is just to consciously realize that baseball isn’t everything. The popular marketing term of “no days off” can be a toxic mindset. There is way too much failure in this game to rely on it and spend everyday thinking about it.

“Baseball is beautiful and perfect in every way — but it’s not everything.” – American Baseball Camps

 

The best baseball summer camps in the country are American Baseball Camps: Wilmington NC | Phoenix AZ | Wichita KS | KC MO| Tahlequah OK | Tulsa OK

American Baseball Camps — 6.5 Reasons Why You Should Get Your Kid In A Summer Camp

May 08, 2017

The average kid aged 5-12 spends 6.5 hours a day in front of a screen!

Here are 6.5 reasons why you should get your in a summer camp for kids.

#1 Happiness

study performed by students at Northwestern revealed that there is a “dark side” to media, and that your kid’s social media consumption should be monitored. Even though they may not intend it to, children being exposed to the wrong messages often enough can be desensitized, more aggressive, and less happy. Spending time outdoors, however, raises levels of Vitamin D, promotes social skills, and develops athleticism. Leaving you with an overall better-developed & happier camper.

#2 Social Skills

study from New York Behavioral Health finds that too much media for your kid could inhibit his/her social skills. They highlight significant risks associated with too much media, such as: cyberbullying, social skill reduction, and “facebook depression”. All-in-all, they find that the more your kid communicates with friends outside, rather than on social media, the better his social skills will become.

#3 Obesity Rates

Childhood obesity rates have maintained around 17% for the past ten years. Statistics by kidshealth.org show that children who consistently spend more than 4 hours per day watching TV are more likely to be overweight. They also recommend that parents place limits on screen time, which includes TV, social media, and video games. Media should not take the place of being physically active.

#4 To Face Challenges

Camps like American Baseball Camps provide fun and challenging games and activities that help kids persevere and conquer challenges. We believe that when kids are encouraged, and treated like they are great, they tend to rise to the occasion and play better. Either way, facing tough challenges at camp helps kids to find their creative/competitive/athletic side.

#5 To Try New Things

New activities that take kids out of their comfort zone can have remarkable benefits! We find that the kids that come into our camps, sometimes timid, leave happy and outgoing!

#6 Developing Friendships

Developing friendships is a big part of what you get with camps like American Baseball Camps. Being able to socialize is one thing, but being able to quickly develop friendships is another! We at American Baseball Camps preach being a team player. We find that working together as a team is a much better lesson to teach than trying to do it all by yourself. Teamwork is important in baseball and in life. We see this as having multiple applications for the child’s academic life, sports life, and home life.

#6.5 Making Memories

Camps can be the highlight of your child’s summer! Great camps create memories that stick with a child for a lifetime! Enough with all the media. Encourage your kid to put the phone down, and get outside and make memories that he’ll never forget!

Thought this blog was beneficial? please share on FB and like us on FB & Instagram!

To sign your kid up for one of our camps — Check out our camps here!

Blog provided by American Baseball Camps — ABC’s mission is to make baseball fun again so they provide great summer fun camps for kids ages 12 and under. If you will share this blog post and use coupon code: “blog” at checkout, you can receive 20% off your order!

American Baseball Camps have baseball camps in Tulsa, a baseball camp in Wichita, baseball camp in Wilmington, baseball camp in Dallas, baseball camp in KC, & baseball camp in Tahlequah! If you’re looking for something fun to do this summer, check out American Baseball Camps!

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Comment *